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"Mr. President"

"Mr. President"

In this startling look at the birth of American government, award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger shows how George Washington transformed the presidency from a ceremonial post into the most powerful office on earth. Washington combined political cunning, daring, and sheer genius to seize ever-widening powers and impose law and order on the young nation while ensuring individual freedom for its citizens.
100 Days to Victory: How the Great War Was Fought and Won 1914-1918

100 Days to Victory: How the Great War Was Fought and Won 1914-1918

Saul David’s 100 DAYS TO VICTORY is a totally original, utterly engaging account of the Great War – the first book to tell the story of the ‘war to end all wars’ through the events of one hundred key days between 1914 and 1918.

100 DAYS TO VICTORY is a 360 degree portrait of a global conflict that stretched east from the shores of Britain to the marshes of Iraq, and south from the forests of Russia to the bush of German South East Africa. Throughout his gripping narrative we hear the voices of men and women both eminent and ordinary, some who were spectators on the Home Front, others – including Saul David’s own family – who were deeply embroiled in epic battles that changed the world forever.

100 DAYS TO VICTORY is the work of a great historian and supreme story teller. Most importantly, it is also an enthralling tribute to a generation whose sacrifice should never be forgotten.
100 Headlines That Changed The World

100 Headlines That Changed The World

Newpapers are a form of instant history, capturing forever the awe and fascination that great historical events inspire. They are also an intriguing source to return to as they reveal the contemporary view of world-changing events, before it can be shaped by subsequent developments.

While newspapers have been around for centuries, it was only when the Industrial Revolution encouraged mass production that newspapers with attention-grabbing banner headlines began to be commonplace. Now that newspapers seem to be in decline, we can look back at the period from the late 19th to early 21st century as the heyday of the newspaper, as well as a period in which the world changed beyond recognition.

Journalist James Maloney details the stories behind the 100 most momentous headlines, including:

Abraham Lincoln Assassinated in 1865.
Jack the Ripper (1888).
Boer War begins (11 Oct 1899).
Russian Revolution (1917).
Wall Street Crashes in 1929.
Hitler Sweeps to Power’ in 1933.
Britain declares war with Germany 3 Sept 1939).
Japan declares war on US/ Attack on Pearl Harbor (7 December 1941).
Communist China founded by Mao Tse-tung (1 October 1949).
Watson and Crick discover DNA structure (1953).
Cuban missile crisis (1962).
J.F. Kennedy Assassinated (22 Nov 1963).
First man on the moon/Apollo 11 (21 July 1969).
Scientists identify AIDS (1981).
Chernobyl (April 26 1986).
Mandela (age 75) freed from jail (1990).
Death of Princess Diana (31 Aug 1997).
911 terror attacks (2001).
Saddam Hussein’s capture (13 Dec 2003).
Bin Laden Shot Dead. in 2011.
Death of Steve Jobs/Apple (5 October 2011).
100 Military Inventions that Changed the World

100 Military Inventions that Changed the World

Nothing ensures the rapid development of new technology like the involvement of the military. From the trebuchet and the cannon to the tank and the ballistic missile, military research programmes have produced the most devastating weapons imaginable, but military masterminds are responsible for a number of surprises along the way as well.

Radar, walkie-talkies and the jet engine are more obvious examples of military inventions that are now in everyday use around the world, but there are plenty of items with which all of us come into contact on a daily basis that have been developed from military technology.

Rod Green describes how the microwave oven in your kitchen, the sat-nav in your car or the Internet that you use every day all owe their existence to the military as he takes us on a highly entertaining voyage of discovery through the world of military inventions ancient and modern.
100 Nasty Women of History

100 Nasty Women of History

‘Vital readingSTYLIST

‘…hooting with laughter – what a swashbuckler that Hannah Jewell is’ MARINA HYDE

‘Because 100 Nasty Women is so easy to read and witty, I didn’t expect it to be the life changing, important book that I’m discovering it to be’ PHILIPPA PERRY

‘A fantastic addition to your feminist library and historical knowledge.’ ANN SHEN, author of Bad Girls Throughout History

* * * * * *

100 fascinating and brilliantly written stories about history’s bravest, baddest but little known ‘nasty’ women from across the world.

These are the women who were deemed too nasty for their times, too nasty to be recognised, too nasty to be paid for their work and sometimes too nasty to be allowed to live.

When you learn about women in history, they’re often made out to be shining, glittering souls. But when you hear about these Bold-Yet-Morally-Irreproachable Women of History who were 100% Pure and Good™, you’re probably not being told the best bits of her life. You probably missed the part where she:

Slept around
Wore men’s clothes
Crashed planes
Led a revolution
Terrorised the seven seas
Wrote ~sensual poetry~
Punched a Nazi (metaphorically, but not always)

These are the women you’ve probably never heard of, but should. Take these stories and tell them to your friends, because everyone should know about the nasty women from history who gave zero f*cks whatsoever. These are the 100 Nasty Women of History you need to know about.
1215: The Year of Magna Carta

1215: The Year of Magna Carta

On 15 June 1215, rebel barons forced King John to meet them at Runnymede. They did not trust the King, so he was not allowed to leave until his seal was attached to the charter in front of him.

This was Magna Carta. It was a revolutionary document. Never before had royal authority been so fundamentally challenged. Nearly 800 years later, two of the charter’s sixty-three clauses are still a ringing expression of freedom for mankind: ‘To no one will we sell, to no one will we deny or delay right or justice’. And: ‘No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or in any way ruined, except by the lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land’.

1215 – The Year of Magna Carta explores what it was like to be alive in that momentous year. Political power struggles are interwoven with other issues – fashion, food, education, medicine, religion, sex. In many areas it was a time of innovation and change. Windmills were erected, spectacles were invented. Dozens of new towns were founded. Oxford became the first university in England, and the great cathedrals of Salisbury and Lincoln were built.

Whether describing matters of state or domestic life, this is a treasure house of a book, rich in detail and full of enthralling insights into the medieval world.
1619

1619

1619 offers a new interpretation of the significance of Jamestown in the long trajectory of American history. Jamestown, the cradle of American democracy, also saw the birth of our nation’s greatest challenge: the corrosive legacy of slavery and racism that have deepened and entrenched stark inequalities in our society.

After running Jamestown under martial law from 1610-1616, the Virginia Company turned toward representative government in an effort to provide settlers with more control over their own affairs and more incentive to invest further in the colony. Governor Edwin Sandys dreamed of creating a real commonwealth, to provide for the interests of settlers and Indians alike. Thus, in late July 1619, the newly-formed General Assembly gathered to introduce “just Laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people.” It was the first legislature in America, and history has cast it as the foundation of American freedom and democracy. From that moment on, propertied white colonists became accustomed to freedoms that would have been unthinkable in England with its layers of customs and hierarchy of courts and regulations, and these expanding political and economic freedoms attracted countless British immigrants and other Europeans to Virginia and the American colonies.

But those very freedoms also permitted the wholesale and largely unchecked exploitation of poor white laborers and non-European peoples. More than nine-tenths of all those arriving in Virginia at this time were brought in some form of servitude or labor contract. In a cruel irony, 1619 also saw the arrival of the first African slaves in Virginia. The establishment of the General Assembly did nothing to ameliorate these disparities, but rather put ever more power in the hands of local grandees. Sandys’s dream of creating a commonwealth in the interests of settlers and Indians proved short-lived. But the twin pillars of democracy-the rule of law and representative government based on the consent of the people-survived and flourished. It was his greatest legacy to America. What was lost was his steadfast conviction that serving the common good served all.

This is a pattern we recognize all too well in modern American society-opportunities are not shared, inequality is rampant, racism is systemic. We would like to think these are problems that can be solved by expanding representative democracy; Jamestown teaches us, instead, that these are problems have long been created and encouraged by American democracy. Casting a skeptical eye on deeply-cherished myths, 1619 will be essential reading for anyone struggling to understand the paradox of American freedom.
1666

1666

1666 was a watershed year for England. The outbreak of the Great Plague, the eruption of the second Dutch War and the Great Fire of London all struck the country in rapid succession and with devastating repercussions.

Shedding light on these dramatic events, historian Rebecca Rideal reveals an unprecedented period of terror and triumph. Based on original archival research and drawing on little-known sources, 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire takes readers on a thrilling journey through a crucial turning point in English history, as seen through the eyes of an extraordinary cast of historical characters.

While the central events of this significant year were ones of devastation and defeat, 1666 also offers a glimpse of the incredible scientific and artistic progress being made at that time, from Isaac Newton’s discovery of gravity to Robert Hooke’s microscopic wonders. It was in this year that John Milton completed Paradise Lost, Frances Stewart posed for the now-iconic image of Britannia, and a young architect named Christopher Wren proposed a plan for a new London – a stone phoenix to rise from the charred ashes of the old city.

With flair and style, 1666 shows a city and a country on the cusp of modernity, and a series of events that forever altered the course of history.
1700 : Scenes from London Life

1700 : Scenes from London Life

More than a capital city, Londoners had witnessed the unthinkable – the public execution of a king at Whitehall. Thousands had died in the Plague of 1665, then the Great Fire of 1666. But from the ashes rose a modern city, rebuilt with the shining dome of Christopher Wren’s St Paul’s Cathedral, symbolising a new strength and confidence. London, with a population of over half a million, was now Europe’s largest, richest and most cosmopolitian city.

Maureen Waller describes a familiar yet alien world. Using anecdotes, detail and amusing contrasts, she draws on court records newspapers, and recorded eyewitness accounts to create a vividly colourful vision. of a city at a unique moment in its history.
1812

1812

When war broke out between Britain and the United States in 1812, America’s prospects looked dismal. British naval aggression made it clear that the ocean would be the war’s primary battlefield,but America’s navy, only twenty ships strong, faced a practiced British fleet of more than a thousand men-of-war. Still, through a combination of nautical deftness and sheer bravado, a handful of heroic captains and their stalwart crews managed to turn the tide of the war, besting the haughty skippers of the mighty Royal Navy and cementing America’s newly won independence. In 1812: The Navy’s War , award-winning naval historian George C. Daughan draws on a wealth of archival research to tell the amazing story of this tiny, battletested team of Americans and their improbable yet pivotal victories. Daughan thrillingly details the pitched naval battles that shaped the war, and shows how these clashes proved the navy’s vital role in preserving the nation’s interests and independence. A stunning contribution to military and national history, 1812: The Navy’s War is the first complete account in more than a century of how the U.S. Navy rescued the fledgling nation and secured America’s future.
1836 Facts About The Alamo And The Texas War For Independence

1836 Facts About The Alamo And The Texas War For Independence

This handy paperback in the Savas “Facts About” series covers all aspects of the famous campaign in surprising detail, with much hard-to-find information on the background of the participants, the Mexican viewpoint, and the continuing mystery of possible survivors. Contains bibliography and update on recent research.
1848: Year Of Revolution

1848: Year Of Revolution

In 1848, Europe was engulfed in a firestorm of revolution. The streets of cities from Paris to Bucharest and from Berlin to Palermo were barricaded and flooded by armed insurgents proclaiming political liberties and national freedom. The conservative order which had held sway since the fall of Napoleon in 1815 crumbled beneath the revolutionary assault.

This book narrates the breathtaking events which overtook Europe in 1848, tracing brilliantly their course from the exhilaration of the liberal triumph, through the fear of social chaos to the final despair of defeat and disillusionment. The failures of 1848 would scar European history with the contradictions of authoritarianism and revolution until deep into the twentieth century.
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